Author Topic: Today I quit. Tomorrow, I'll quit again. (A journey through one man's recovery)  (Read 17025 times)

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Offline Nomore1959

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Re: Today, I quit. Tomorrow, I'll quit again
« Reply #43 on: February 26, 2016, 05:54:00 AM »
Seems were roughly the same age. Your quit will do wonders for bp with bonus help on cholesterol numbers -- my quit has. On the roll post, "cut" then leave the lower box empty. That too gets easier over time.

Offline KSO FTZ

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Re: Today, I quit. Tomorrow, I'll quit again
« Reply #42 on: February 26, 2016, 02:33:00 AM »
Quote from: corbin
22 years on that shit for me. you got the idea right......post roll every day. keep shit out of your mouth. support other quiters. done. that's it. quit with you today brother!!!!! gonna quit with you tomorrow too...and the next...and the next.
Ftz
kso

Offline Corbin

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Re: Today, I quit. Tomorrow, I'll quit again
« Reply #41 on: February 25, 2016, 05:20:00 PM »
Quote from: wildirish317
Quote from: Idaho
Welcome,
Nice work posting roll. My blood pressure has improved dramatically since I quit.
Read up and get active, focus your energy and stay active.
Look forward to quitting with you,
Idaho Spuds 556
Thanks. When I attempted to post roll using the listed steps:

Instructions for posting roll:
1. Quote the LATEST roll post. - I did this okay.
2. Left click the bottom box. - The bottom box is the "Post Reply" box. I left clicked it, thinking it wouldn't post unless I had typed something along with the quote.

So now I'm staring at my non-reply to the quoted roll post. I had to edit the post and take out the "quote" brackets, and then put my post in there. It worked out okay, and I can do this in the future, but I would like to know what this "bottom box" looks like.

Can someone post a screen shot?
Welcome my Friend.

28 year user here, if I can do it so can you. You have to develop a hatred for the Nic Bitch and how she controlled you for so many years, slowly killing yourself. Demand your Freedom.

Go to You tube and look for instruction to post on Kill the Can. They have videos for how to post on phones or computers. This is the only way I figured it out.

PM me anytime.

I quit with you today.

Corbin 344

Offline wildirish317

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Re: Today, I quit. Tomorrow, I'll quit again
« Reply #40 on: February 25, 2016, 05:09:00 PM »
Quote from: Idaho
Welcome,
Nice work posting roll. My blood pressure has improved dramatically since I quit.
Read up and get active, focus your energy and stay active.
Look forward to quitting with you,
Idaho Spuds 556
Thanks. When I attempted to post roll using the listed steps:

Instructions for posting roll:
1. Quote the LATEST roll post. - I did this okay.
2. Left click the bottom box. - The bottom box is the "Post Reply" box. I left clicked it, thinking it wouldn't post unless I had typed something along with the quote.

So now I'm staring at my non-reply to the quoted roll post. I had to edit the post and take out the "quote" brackets, and then put my post in there. It worked out okay, and I can do this in the future, but I would like to know what this "bottom box" looks like.

Can someone post a screen shot?
“Everything good that has happened to me has happened as a direct result of helping someone else, everything". - Danny Trejo

Offline Idaho Spuds

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Re: Today, I quit. Tomorrow, I'll quit again
« Reply #39 on: February 25, 2016, 04:06:00 PM »
Welcome,
Nice work posting roll. My blood pressure has improved dramatically since I quit.
Read up and get active, focus your energy and stay active.
Look forward to quitting with you,
Idaho Spuds 556

Offline RDB

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Re: Today, I quit. Tomorrow, I'll quit again
« Reply #38 on: February 25, 2016, 03:42:00 PM »
I'm 25 years into my addiction, and you hit the nail on the head. One day at a time. Quit today, stay quit all day, quit again tomorrow. Quit one day at a time for the rest of your life.

Offline emc4

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Re: Today, I quit. Tomorrow, I'll quit again
« Reply #37 on: February 25, 2016, 03:34:00 PM »
Quote from: wildirish317
Hi all. I'll be 56 years old in less than a month. I've been chewing tobacco products since I was 18. When in college, I learned not to spit so I could chew while in class. I've switched back and forth between loose leaf and the can throughout the years, depending on the cost of the product. At last count, I was going through 2 cans per week. That may not sound like a lot, but remember, I wasn't wasting any nicotine.

So, why do I want to quit at this stage of life? That's a good question, and it boils down to health in general and blood pressure in particular.

A year and a half ago, my wife, worried about muscular atrophy in people 50+ years old, got us involved in a strength training routine. I noticed myself getting slimmer and trimmer and stronger at the same time. Now, I'm about as healthy as I can be except for my blood pressure, which is not quite high enough to take medication. I don't take medication, except for the occasional infection, and I don't want to spend my final days taking pills every day.

Doing a little research, I found three things I consume that will raise a person's blood pressure: nicotine, caffeine, and alcohol. I'm addicted to all three. I'm not an alcoholic, but I drink more than I should on a daily basis.

I decided to take these addictions on one at a time. Nicotine is first. The mother of all addictive substances. I decided to give it up for Lent, figuring if I can make it 40 days, then I'm home free. I made it through Ash Wednesday and the following Thursday and Friday. I went through all of the shite we go through in the first three days and was really, extremely, irritable. I caved on Saturday, telling myself that I can wean myself off this stuff. I've been weaning myself since then, and it's not working.

So here I am. I quit today. I can make it through today. Tomorrow's another day, and I'll have to quit again. I know I can't do this alone. I need help. That's why I'm here.
First, welcome to freedom! You are making one of, if not the best decisions of your life. At this point, it doesn't matter how long you were using or how old you are; what matters is you are quit. I see you already posted roll in the June '16 quit group. Well done! Now keep your promise for today, and right when you wake up tomorrow morning, post your # of days quit and your promise to stay quit for that day.

As an addict (as all of us are), there is no such thing as "home free" after a certain period of time. Look around this site and see how late in the game some of these guys have caved. They lost focus, thought they had it figured out, got away from this site and the tools/support it provides and fell right back into the addiction. You can't get complacent and you have to stay vigilant and committed. You do that by taking it one day at a time, every damn day (ODAATEDD). Post roll first thing every day, and stay engaged with your quit group. Get some tools ready to help get through the tough times. Sunflower seeds, gum, mints, cranberry juice, water...always have something at the ready for when that craving hits.

Looks like you had a false start and figured out weaning doesn't work. It doesn't...you're either quit or you're not. Now you are quit, so don't look back. We're all here to help so use the support at your fingertips. Glad to be quit with you today and just watch how your life will dramatically improve over the coming days, weeks, months, etc.

Look forward to seeing you on roll tomorrow

Offline wildirish317

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Today, I quit. Tomorrow, I'll quit again
« Reply #36 on: February 25, 2016, 02:55:00 PM »
Index:
My Quit Rage - Hour 30
Digging a quit hole
The Three Questions
You only quit when you die
The Lessons of Bowe
Dip Dream #1
My Quit Plan
The Law of Addiction
The Road Called Recovery
The Symptoms of Post-Acute Withdrawal
How to Survive Post-Acute Withdrawal
Answering the three questions - Reprise
Fences
100 Days In - Now What?
Living with PAWs
Getting to - "Not thinking about it anymore"
No Excuse To Cave - NONE!
Lessons from TEC
The Continuing Fight With PAWs
Thoughts on GroupMe
1st Year Anniversary - “I got this!”
Fuck It
Time to Leave KTC? (meet the Nic BitchÂ’s sister)
When Do I Get Back To Normal?
I am Quit
The Value of Documenting Your Journey
Hi all. I'll be 56 years old in less than a month. I've been chewing tobacco products since I was 18. When in college, I learned not to spit so I could chew while in class. I've switched back and forth between loose leaf and the can throughout the years, depending on the cost of the product. At last count, I was going through 2 cans per week. That may not sound like a lot, but remember, I wasn't wasting any nicotine.

So, why do I want to quit at this stage of life? That's a good question, and it boils down to health in general and blood pressure in particular.

A year and a half ago, my wife, worried about muscular atrophy in people 50+ years old, got us involved in a strength training routine. I noticed myself getting slimmer and trimmer and stronger at the same time. Now, I'm about as healthy as I can be except for my blood pressure, which is not quite high enough to take medication. I don't take medication, except for the occasional infection, and I don't want to spend my final days taking pills every day.

Doing a little research, I found three things I consume that will raise a person's blood pressure: nicotine, caffeine, and alcohol. I'm addicted to all three. I'm not an alcoholic, but I drink more than I should on a daily basis.

I decided to take these addictions on one at a time. Nicotine is first. The mother of all addictive substances. I decided to give it up for Lent, figuring if I can make it 40 days, then I'm home free. I made it through Ash Wednesday and the following Thursday and Friday. I went through all of the shite we go through in the first three days and was really, extremely, irritable. I caved on Saturday, telling myself that I can wean myself off this stuff. I've been weaning myself since then, and it's not working.

So here I am. I quit today. I can make it through today. Tomorrow's another day, and I'll have to quit again. I know I can't do this alone. I need help. That's why I'm here.
“Everything good that has happened to me has happened as a direct result of helping someone else, everything". - Danny Trejo

Offline wildirish317

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Not sure what's happened to the intro section.  At least in my case, people seem to read, but not comment.  It's kind of sad.

I just made a bold statement that goals are for losers, and then made an argument for adopting systems instead of goals.  Yet, I used goals to support using systems to achieve these goals.

What goals did I list? 
  • Having your natural teeth at age 80.
  • Be healthy.
  • Freedom from nicotine.

Surely you guys are smart enough to challenge me when I do this.

Am I off limits because I've been free from nicotine for 3 years?  I still make a conscience decision to quit every day, just like you.

Feel free to push back.  This is life.  This is important.
I’ll bite... I’ve been around longer than you even ;)

Goals and systems exist for each other. Why have a system to follow when you have no goal? Goals by themselves are just a desired outcome and mean nothing. I can set goals all I want but, so what? It’s just talk. I can follow a system all damn day but without an end result being worked towards it’s just pointless busywork.

Goals really aren’t for losers... you need them to keep moving forward and growing and evolving... BUT... without a system in place to reach it you’re gonna lose and end up trying over and over and...

We hate that here.

Exactly!  I should pause here and credit my "Goals are for Losers" post to Scott Adams (author of Dilbert) in his latest book "How to Fail at Almost Everything and Still Win Big", which is a good read, btw.

It kind of follows something that's been with me all of my life: every action you take moves you closer to, or farther from your goals.  The idea of using a defined system came from Scott.

I can look at my life and see the systems I've used to become a better version of myself.  I can't say that I consciously constructed these systems.  They are just habits I've adopted.

The trick with goals is to make them more general, as in "I want to be fit and trim" rather than "I want to lose 50 lbs by this time next year".  Then you can find a system to move you in the right direction, every day.

Sometimes you have to put a time limit on it, which is usually "now".  When you lose your job, for example, or want to quit nicotine.
“Everything good that has happened to me has happened as a direct result of helping someone else, everything". - Danny Trejo

Offline AppleJack

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Not sure what's happened to the intro section.  At least in my case, people seem to read, but not comment.  It's kind of sad.

I just made a bold statement that goals are for losers, and then made an argument for adopting systems instead of goals.  Yet, I used goals to support using systems to achieve these goals.

What goals did I list? 
  • Having your natural teeth at age 80.
  • Be healthy.
  • Freedom from nicotine.

Surely you guys are smart enough to challenge me when I do this.

Am I off limits because I've been free from nicotine for 3 years?  I still make a conscience decision to quit every day, just like you.

Feel free to push back.  This is life.  This is important.
I’ll bite... I’ve been around longer than you even ;)

Goals and systems exist for each other. Why have a system to follow when you have no goal? Goals by themselves are just a desired outcome and mean nothing. I can set goals all I want but, so what? It’s just talk. I can follow a system all damn day but without an end result being worked towards it’s just pointless busywork.

Goals really aren’t for losers... you need them to keep moving forward and growing and evolving... BUT... without a system in place to reach it you’re gonna lose and end up trying over and over and...

We hate that here.
Well, it’s one louder, isn’t it? It’s not ten.

Offline Skolvikings

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Not sure what's happened to the intro section.  At least in my case, people seem to read, but not comment.  It's kind of sad.

I just made a bold statement that goals are for losers, and then made an argument for adopting systems instead of goals.  Yet, I used goals to support using systems to achieve these goals.

What goals did I list? 
  • Having your natural teeth at age 80.
  • Be healthy.
  • Freedom from nicotine.

Surely you guys are smart enough to challenge me when I do this.

Am I off limits because I've been free from nicotine for 3 years?  I still make a conscience decision to quit every day, just like you.

Feel free to push back.  This is life.  This is important.

I love what you are saying and take it as law.


Yes you are off limits as you are a Yoda of quit that many of us look up to as a back lit pedestal of quit knowledge.


This is a honest, genuine, and sincere compliment.... thank you for being you.
Be humble... grow everyday.

I fear I will always be chasing the vortex like a drug. None will be as special as my first hit.

MY HOF SPEECH

Offline wildirish317

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Not sure what's happened to the intro section.  At least in my case, people seem to read, but not comment.  It's kind of sad.

I just made a bold statement that goals are for losers, and then made an argument for adopting systems instead of goals.  Yet, I used goals to support using systems to achieve these goals.

What goals did I list? 
  • Having your natural teeth at age 80.
  • Be healthy.
  • Freedom from nicotine.

Surely you guys are smart enough to challenge me when I do this.

Am I off limits because I've been free from nicotine for 3 years?  I still make a conscience decision to quit every day, just like you.

Feel free to push back.  This is life.  This is important.
“Everything good that has happened to me has happened as a direct result of helping someone else, everything". - Danny Trejo

Offline wildirish317

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Goals are for Losers?

Do you have a goal, or several?  Is your goal to make it to the HOF at 100 days quit?  Until you reach that magical 100 days, it's still in the future.  You haven't met your goal.  You're a loser until you meet that goal.  Then you need another goal, or else you're lost, like a ship without a rudder, spinning around at sea.

ODAAT - One Day At A Time.  Do you wonder why we stress this?  Anyone can quit for a day.  Hell, you can do practically anything for a day.

Throw out your goal, and replace it with a system.  What is a system?  It's something you can do now, and repeat, that takes you in the direction you want to go.

Do you want to have your natural teeth when you're 80?  Brush your teeth when you get up in the morning and before you go to bed, and floss once per day.

Do you want to be healthy?  Find a meal plan that you can live with every day, and adopt that meal plan every day.  Also exercise every day, even if it's a mile walk.

Do you want freedom from nicotine?  Make a promise on a website to a few hundred other addicts every day that you will not use nicotine today.  Then keep that promise.

Three years ago today, I threw out a fresh can of Copenhagen and promised not to use nicotine that day.  Every day since then, I have posted that promise on a website.  I used to long for the day that I wouldn't have to post that promise. 

Now, I embrace that promise.  It's my system for success!
« Last Edit: February 28, 2019, 04:42:12 PM by wildirish317 »
“Everything good that has happened to me has happened as a direct result of helping someone else, everything". - Danny Trejo

Offline wildirish317

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Deciding vs Wanting

If you want success, figure out the price, then pay it.

You did that when you started posting roll here.  You wanted to quit.  You learned that the price of freedom from nicotine is to post roll here every day.  You decided to pay the price and now you are here, free from nicotine. 

How long did you want to quit before you decided to quit?

What else do you want out of life?  When will you decide to pay the price and get it?  Don't waste your life wanting.  Decide!
“Everything good that has happened to me has happened as a direct result of helping someone else, everything". - Danny Trejo

Offline Croakenhagen

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I am still a relatively new quitter compared to most here. I will say this, posts like these are what keep me going, brother. I read these and see how I felt at many points in my quit thus far. Thank you for bringing these over.

Croak - day 169 and incredibly thankful for veteran quitters like yourself, Irish!
Humbled.